BLM Co-Founder Goes on Million Dollar Real Estate Buying Spree

By Grant Atkinson


The Black Lives Matter movement has often faced questions regarding the motives behind its destructive behavior. If co-founder Patrisse Khan-Cullors’ recent real estate binge is any indication, those motives might not be so pure.


According to the New York Post, Khan-Cullors recently purchased a home worth more than $1 million in a Los Angeles County neighborhood known as Topanga Canyon.


“The property, which is about a 15-minute drive from Malibu beaches, features bamboo floors and vaulted ceilings, according to the listing,” the Post reported.


This is not the only high-end property that Khan-Cullors has recently purchased. A separate article from the New York Post said that she has purchased four homes totaling $3.2 million in the United States alone in the past few years.


First, Khan-Callors purchased a $510,000 home in Inglewood, California in 2016. Next, she spent $590,000 a property in south Los Angeles, according to the Post.


Third, Khan-Callors and her spouse, Janaya Khan, purchased a $450,000 “custom ranch” in Georgia complete with an indoor pool, airplane hanger, and “RV shop” in 2020.

Finally, she purchased her most expensive home yet with this latest $1.4 million property in Topanga Canyon.


Obviously, a woman who describes herself as a “trained Marxist” seems hypocritical for spending $3 million on homes in the last five years. However, this latest purchase is hypocritical in even more ways than one.


According to the Post, the neighborhood of Topanga Canyon is 88 percent white. The purchase comes as BLM activists claim to be supporting black-owned businesses and majority-black areas.


In September 2020, The New York Times reported that BLM activists were marching into primarily white neighborhoods and demanding their allegiance to the cause. Their co-founder now owns a luxury home in the type of neighborhood with which her movement previously took issue.


The gross hypocrisy on display from Khan-Callors is, unfortunately, not all that surprising. As rioters walked out of retail stores last summer carrying everything from televisions to tennis shoes, it was clear that personal gain was more important than the supposed “justice” they were fighting for.


Even so, that should not obscure how disgusting this behavior really is. As Matt Walsh of The Daily Wire put it, these activists on the left are hurting the very people they claim to care about.

“BLM is the biggest and most dangerous scam in American history,” he wrote on Twitter. “The grifters at the top of the organization enrich themselves while poor communities across the nation are devastated by the chaos they foment and profit off of. How could anyone still support these con artists?”


Walsh happens to be exactly right. As rioters destroyed parts of Minneapolis following the death of George Floyd, some African-Americans spoke out about the real consequences.


“These people did this for no reason,” Minneapolis resident Stephanie Wilford, a disabled black woman who lived near the Minneapolis riots, told a television reporter in May 2020.


“It’s not going to bring George [Floyd] back here — George is in a better place than we are. And last night, I’m going to be honest, I wish I was where George was because this is ridiculous. These people are tearing up our livelihoods.”

Unfortunately, it appears that the founders at the top of the BLM movement did have a reason, and it was to make money for themselves. According to the Post, BLM took in more than $90 million in 2020 as the “socialists” behind it were purchasing million-dollar homes.

That’s not a great look, especially as many minorities find themselves in situations like Wilford’s due to rioting and looting promoted by the organization.


If Khan-Callors really wanted to help minorities, she could start by not profiting off of their suffering. Unfortunately, exposing her for the fraud that she is will not repair the damage her movement has caused.



Author: Grant Atkinson

Source: Western Journal: BLM Co-Founder Goes on Million Dollar Real Estate Buying Spree